Hyattsville’s historic Lustine Center lives on

By: Ashley Edokpayi

APR. 27, 2014

Arts District walkers stop for a peek at an abstract painting display while neighborhood gym-goers begin their Saturday evening treadmill run just next door.  ‘The Lustine Center’ sign sits atop of the building in bold capital letters and glowing in red luminescent lights, grabbing the attention of those driving along Route One in Hyattsville.

A place that once attracted thousands of automobile buyers from all over the country, the 6,000-square-foot Lustine Center is one of Hyattsville’s historic gems that live on—but instead as an art gallery and fitness center since 2009.  Its unaltered funky-vintage look fits right in with the contemporary artsy scene of the Arts District neighborhood.

As Hyattsville’s Route One has seen vast growth in past five years with the establishment of the Gateway Arts District, The Lustine Center is one of the areas few remaining historic places.  With tall-curving show windows extending up to a flat canopy roof, the elegant showroom is the only automobile dealership from the World War II era that still stands in the D.C. metro area.

The city and EYA residential builders put $2 million into renovations of the showroom in 2003 during the first phase of the Arts District’s construction. They chose to keep some of the classic features of the showroom such as tall columns wrapped in silver mirrors and Chevy murals.

“It’s funny because my grandfather used to tell me stories of when he couldn’t wait to get to The Lustine and check out new cars back in the 40’s,” said 22-year-old Hyattsville resident Harley White.

“I always come for the art exhibits but I always think about those stories and his 1948 Chevy Fleetline,” he said.

With the closing of other historic spots along Route One in Hyattsville, like the 50-year-old Calvert House Inn seafood restaurant that closed in February, The Lustine Center shows how an old space can be utilized for modern use for the hipper crowd that has come into Hyattsville.

The center’s art gallery which opened in March 2009 has featured a variety of exhibits ranging from photography displays, 3D glass and metal figures and paintings—all from local DC and Maryland artists. The gallery is operated and run by Jesse Cohen, founder of artdc.org, and has given artists a chance to successfully exhibit and sell their work.

“With the arts district growing it’s important for local artists to have opportunities to gain exposure,” said HCDC Development Coordinator Justin Fair. The Lustine Gallery has done just that by offering consistently great shows which highlight DC and surrounding area artists, according to visitors. “The gallery is an example of the District stimulating economic development, especially for the artist community here,” said Fair.

In addition to the gallery, Lustine’s fitness center offers a variety of cardio equipment and workout machines with an accompanying full-service juice bar for members.

Prior to what it is now, The Lustine Center was a premier Chevrolet and Oldsmobile showroom during the 1920’s and 30’s when automobile consumerism first became glamorized in the U.S.  It was one of the few showrooms in the Mid-Atlantic region which had a unique architectural design with its huge glass windows that attracted many who passed by.

The owner, Philip Lustine, opened the dealership in 1926 as the ‘Lustine-Nicholson Motor Company’ and it became Chevrolet’s top performing franchise in a decade with an annual revenue of $2.5 million—a major deal during that era.

“You get that vintage-y vibe of the place outside while hustling artists show their work inside,” said White. “It’s like an ‘old money’ turned into ‘new money’ kinda thing,” he said.

(Word Count: 613)

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Hyattsville law bans discrimination against transgender individuals

By: Ashley Edokpayi

APR. 27, 2014

Arts District walkers stop for a peek at an abstract painting display while neighborhood gym-goers begin their Saturday evening treadmill run just next door.  ‘The Lustine Center’ sign sits atop of the building in bold capital letters and glowing in red luminescent lights, grabbing the attention of those driving along Route One in Hyattsville.

A place that once attracted thousands of automobile buyers from all over the country, the 6,000-square-foot Lustine Center is one of Hyattsville’s historic gems that live on—but instead as an art gallery and fitness center since 2009.  Its unaltered funky-vintage look fits right in with the contemporary artsy scene of the Arts District neighborhood.

As Hyattsville’s Route One has seen vast growth in past five years with the establishment of the Gateway Arts District, The Lustine Center is one of the areas few remaining historic places.  With tall-curving show windows extending up to a flat canopy roof, the elegant showroom is the only automobile dealership from the World War II era that still stands in the D.C. metro area.

The city and EYA residential builders put $2 million into renovations of the showroom in 2003 during the first phase of the Arts District’s construction. They chose to keep some of the classic features of the showroom such as tall columns wrapped in silver mirrors and Chevy murals.

“It’s funny because my grandfather used to tell me stories of when he couldn’t wait to get to The Lustine and check out new cars back in the 40’s,” said 22-year-old Hyattsville resident Harley White.

“I always come for the art exhibits but I always think about those stories and his 1948 Chevy Fleetline,” he said.

With the closing of other historic spots along Route One in Hyattsville, like the 50-year-old Calvert House Inn seafood restaurant that closed in February, The Lustine Center shows how an old space can be utilized for modern use for the hipper crowd that has come into Hyattsville.

The center’s art gallery which opened in March 2009 has featured a variety of exhibits ranging from photography displays, 3D glass and metal figures and paintings—all from local DC and Maryland artists. The gallery is operated and run by Jesse Cohen, founder of artdc.org, and has given artists a chance to successfully exhibit and sell their work.

“With the arts district growing it’s important for local artists to have opportunities to gain exposure,” said HCDC Development Coordinator Justin Fair. The Lustine Gallery has done just that by offering consistently great shows which highlight DC and surrounding area artists, according to visitors. “The gallery is an example of the District stimulating economic development, especially for the artist community here,” said Fair.

In addition to the gallery, Lustine’s fitness center offers a variety of cardio equipment and workout machines with an accompanying full-service juice bar for members.

Prior to what it is now, The Lustine Center was a premier Chevrolet and Oldsmobile showroom during the 1920’s and 30’s when automobile consumerism first became glamorized in the U.S.  It was one of the few showrooms in the Mid-Atlantic region which had a unique architectural design with its huge glass windows that attracted many who passed by.

The owner, Philip Lustine, opened the dealership in 1926 as the ‘Lustine-Nicholson Motor Company’ and it became Chevrolet’s top performing franchise in a decade with an annual revenue of $2.5 million—a major deal during that era.

“You get that vintage-y vibe of the place outside while hustling artists show their work inside,” said White. “It’s like an ‘old money’ turned into ‘new money’ kinda thing,” he said.

(Word Count: 613)

A City Divided: Hyattsville’s older neighborhoods suffer lack in public services

By: Ashley Edokpayi

MAY 11, 2014

A walk through Hyattsville’s Arts District strip on a Friday evening allows a voyeur’s glimpse at the new population that has migrated into the city. Boutique retailers close up shop as the Busboys and Poets restaurant begins to fill for poetry night. Gym goers finish up at the Lustine Fitness Center’s juice bar and jog over to the local MOM’s Organic Market before returning to their high-rise modern condos secured by city police.

 

In a community called the “darling of the area” by Hyattsville residents, the Arts District has rapidly grown over the past four years and attracted a higher income hipster-crowd that has seen little to no crime. The same can’t be said less than a mile across town.

 

Hyattsville, like many gentrifying cities, is a tale of the haves and have not’s. The priority to keep the Arts District a secure and attractive tourist area has caused a lack in public services and safety in the older, less gentrified western parts of the city.

 

“We can enact policies that help development, but we can’t fix the problems directly,” said Hyattsville council member Bart Lawrence who represents the Arts District. City council members can be a voice for residents and suggest solutions to electric companies like Pepco, but action stops there.

 

“I do care what happens in all the other wards but it’s too big a city, there’s too many challenges,” said Lawrence. “I’ve got to keep up with the challenges in my ward,” he said.

 

The Arts District was completed in 2010 as a $200 million mixed-use revitalization project in downtown historic Hyattsville, and has continued its economic development over the past year with new small-scale businesses. It has become the city’s attraction as it has a vibe similar to downtown Washington D.C. hotspots like U-Street, and has brought the arts to Hyattsville with dance studios, art galleries and events for local artists.

 

The sporadic growth of the Arts District over the past four years has brought residents making more than $60,000 in annual income to a city that had a median of $57,000 in household income in 2011. With pricey condos and townhomes, the area has drawn higher income individuals from D.C. and northern Virginia.

 

“Once I saw the city building this place up, I made my move,” said Arts District resident Harley White. In 2012, he moved into a condo in the neighborhood from his home in Cheverly less than ten minutes away.

 

“I like that it’s convenient and safe around here, I don’t worry about much,” said White.

A short drive west of the district along rickety roads with uneven sidewalks and burgundy brick homes dating back to the 1970’s brings one into older Hyattsville. Instead of a Busboys and organic market, there are restaurants and shops offering Hispanic or west African cuisine—reminiscent of the immigrant and ethnic residents who have lived in the city for decades.

 

Although these neighborhoods are less than five minutes from the downtown area, their broken street lights and the paranoia of being mugged make them seem like another world.

A combined total of 49 property theft-related crimes were reported from police in west Hyattsville and Arts District for the months of March and April, 38 of which happened in west Hyattsville neighborhoods.

 

“I check out my surroundings before getting out of my car and going in my house,” said 36-year-old west Hyattsville resident Dameion Russ. A New Orleans native, Russ has lived in the neighborhood with his girlfriend Gloria and her two sons for nearly four years and often works late nights at a restocking company. He said that lights on his street can take up to a month to be replaced.

 

“Sometimes I don’t get home until four in the morning from work so anything can happen,” said Russ.

 

Queens Chapel Manor is one of the neighborhoods close to the West Hyattsville Metro Station on Hamilton Street which has had an increasing trend in theft crimes in recent years because of a lack in proper street lighting. This Metro station is walking distance to many homes of daily commuters who’ve been victims of robbery.

 

Officer Patrick Ojong has worked for Hyattsville City Police for seven years. He said that robberies near the Metro station in West Hyattsville haven’t gone down much.

 

“It’s dark over there so people can’t really see who is approaching them,” said Ojong.

 

Poor street lighting has also been a possible reason for car theft and vandalism between the hours of 1am and 9am on residential streets in older city neighborhoods. A total of 11 theft crimes have happened in this area from January to the end of March according to Hyattsville police reports, three of which residents’ cars were broken into. One car was left with punctured tires, a shattered windshield and stolen license plates the week of March 9.

 

Jefferson Street resident Shirley Fisher has also observed situations that have resulted from broken streetlights in west Hyattsville. “There’s an older lady who walks home from the Metro on my street and I feel bad when I can’t pick her up on some days,” said Fisher. She expressed her concern at a council meeting last December where council members stated that the issue would be addressed as soon as possible. While some lights have been fixed since then, more are now out.

 

With brightly-lit parking lots and streets, the Arts District hasn’t had theft issues recently, but car break-ins were an issue for a short period in late 2013.

 

There was a spike in auto break-ins in a city owned parking lot and a private lot behind Busboys and Poets in the district, but council reacted quickly and implemented new strategies that ensure lots are patrolled by at least four city police on weekday evenings and weekends. No break in’s have happened in the lots since February.

 

Security cameras and talking security boxes are also in busy Arts District lots. Car owners are reminded through loudspeakers to lock their doors and keep their belongings in a safe place. While the same boxes were placed in West Hyattsville lots in 2010, several of them no longer work. Ojong said they should be fixed soon.

 

The city announced in early March that $200,000 of its 2015 budget would go towards fixing street lights on several West Hyattsville roads that have been left dark.

“That’s just not soon enough, between now and then who knows how many more thefts will happen,” said Russ.

 

While the Hyattsville city police chief has not commented on reasons for disparities in the Arts District compared to that of west Hyattsville neighborhoods, police records have shown that theft and property crime have stayed primarily in west Hyattsville and aren’t going away.

 

“Growing up in New Orleans and later living in Holyoke, Massachusetts I saw these same things like I do here,” said Russ. “It’s just what happens.”

 

Hyattsville City Public Works has not commented on street light repairs.

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Residential Life’s apartment renovations continue

With the completion of the Hillside apartments this winter, the UMBC construction projects have entered their third phase. The renovations of theNanticoke, Gunpowder, Monocacy, Sassafras, Chincoteague and Tuckahoe Terrace apartments are currently in progress.

“I like the new apartments, they are much cleaner than the old ones,” said Julian Toliver, senior media and communications major. Toliver moved into the Casselman building in the Hillside community during the winter as phase 2 of construction came to an end.

Residential living spaces were not limited by these renovations due to the expansion of Patapsco Hall last year. Residential Life scheduled the renovations to coincide with the new wing’s opening to prevent the displacement of residents. Once phase 3 is completed, a total of 225 new spaces will have been gained.

Phase 3 is planned for a midsummer completion. Two additional projects in progress include the new Apartment Community Center, and a widened and repaved Terrace Circle. Also in the works are new trash and recycling enclosures, and a large patio area with seating and grills. Next fall, Potomac Hall will be updated, followed by West Hill apartments the following year.

Many Hillside residents are happy that their service desk, normally located in Terrace, has been moved to the Deep Creek building for the next nine months. “I’m happy that we are able to continue desk services while the renovations continue,” said Douglas Copeland, Terrace and Hillside community director.

“It is way more convenient that the desk is closer to us now,” said Jasmine Williams, junior psychology major, who has been a Hillside resident since last fall. “Now we’re definitely going to get our mail more often.”

When the community center opens in nine months, there will be more space available for community programming, studying, meetings, offices and laundry services. “That’s when I will really be excited!” said Copeland.

Hrabowski to speak at upcoming TED conference TED Talks

Published by The Retriever Weekly on 1/29/13

For the second time in four months, President Hrabowski is scheduled to speak at an upcoming TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) conference. On February 26, he will discuss the importance of encouraging students to enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields and about the successes UMBC has had as an innovative institution.

“We must change the culture of science and teaching,” Hrabowski said at the 2012 TED Mid-Atlantic conference in October. His goal is to continue the growth in research and instruction atUMBC to prepare all students for success. “We are rethinking the approach in such a way that students are empowered to take charge of their education,” he said.

TED is a nonprofit organization that holds a variety of international conferences, events and talks pertaining to technology, entertainment and design. It aims to bring some of the world’s most talented thinkers and doers together to inspire change through ideas.

Hrabowski wants students to continue to work with one another to make the learning experiences associated with STEM majors more enjoyable. “It is possible for children of all races to succeed in the arts, to succeed in science and for America to help the entire world through brain power,” said Hrabowski during his speech in October.

“Most people don’t realize how important those in the STEM fields are to an economy and country as a whole,” said George Abumere, senior computer engineering major. “They play a big role in innovations and creating jobs. Hrabowski certainly understands that.”

With the success of the Meyerhoff Scholars Program and of the university as a whole,UMBC continues to rise as one of the country’s top colleges. Students have access to an abundance of resources and creative approaches to learning.

“I appreciate what he’s doing in terms of encouraging STEM majors,” said junior Ria Smith. As a member of a STEM program, she understands Hrabowski’s push to expand the academic field. “These majors do contribute a lot to society and will offer students great opportunities and experience,” she said.

UMBC looks back with civil rights leaders

Published to The Retriever Weekly on 12/30/12

The Dresher Center for the Humanities held a discussion on Wednesday, Dec. 5 in the Performing Arts and Humanities Building Theater during which panelists discussed the role of the youth in the Civil Rights Movement. Students, faculty and guests filled the theater at 4 p.m. to listen.

“As we look back at the past and at different parts of our lives, we see things differently,” said President Freeman A. Hrabowski. As a child in the1960s, Hrabowski participated in the children’s march for the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham, Alabama.

“It was a painful and raw experience,” said Hrabowski during his speech. He discussed topics of social class, his privileges in a Deep South middle-class neighborhood as well as controversies about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the movement.

Joining President Hrabowski on the panel was Civil Rights Leader and Former Chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Julian Bond, author Andrew B. Lewis and Taylor Branch, both an author and historian who moderated the discussion.

During his speech, Lewis, author of the book The Shadows of Youth: The Remarkable Journey of the Civil Rights Generation, explained: “African Americans broke the law in order to be arrested and show the immorality of segregation. Young people should be inspired by the movement and use it to think of new forms of activism.”

Later on in the discussion, Bond took the time to explain the role of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) which emerged during the 1sit-ins of the 1960s. As a founder of the organization, he described how the organization evolved and was a key factor in youth involvement in the southern movement.

“I think one of the things we see is that this kind of relative prosperity can make people more politically engaged,” said Lewis during the panel discussion. All panelists emphasized the importance of young people becoming actively involved in their communities.

The discussion came to a close around 5:30 p.m. and was followed by a Q&A as well as refreshments in the lobby. “This was definitely enrapturing,” said sophomore and economics major Valerie Parks. She and many other UMBC students were moved by the speakers. “The audience was gripped with emotion,” she said.

A Place of Unity

Exquisite sculptures, striking paintings and arresting drawings. A rich history lies within these lofty marble walls in the heart of the nation’s capital since its establishment in 1968. This is the Smithsonian American Art Museum, where master artists like Georgia O’ Keefe and Christo tell the American story through their works. This engaging aura is also present outside on 8th and F Street NW, where residents, passer-biers and tourists mingle collectively along the buildings’ stairs. Stories are also told here, perhaps a recap of the day’s fun or reminiscent memories from high school. This is a special place of gathering that is here to stay.